We are recruiting, get in touch.

We are recruiting a team member. If you think its you then get in touch. We are a hard working fun bunch, that love to work with trees and nature. Tree surgery can be both an incredibly rewarding job for the right person. 

It’s feeling Festive!

Here at Dedham Vale Tree Surgery we are already starting to feel the Christmas spirit as we notice more and more of our lovely customers in Essex and Suffolk have their Christmas decorations up. If like me your Christmas shopping is not yet complete what about considering a Forestry England membership as a gift? Research shows spending time in nature, especially woodlands, improves our health and wellbeing. If you would like to know more about this please use the link below:

https://www.forestryengland.uk/membership/gift

As usual Dedham Vale Tree Surgery will close for a couple of weeks over Christmas to give everyone a chance to have a good rest and come back revived ready for 2021. We wish all our customers a very merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

Working with cranes

At Dedham Vale Tree Surgery we consider ourselves pretty lucky to be for the most part doing a job we love. Some days are always more fun than others, sometimes it isn’t so good because of tough weather conditions and sometimes it is amazing. This week we had one of the amazing days out in Weeley with a huge crane hired in for the job. Many thanks to the excellent @easterncranehire for the crane hire and well done to the team for carrying out the job so efficiently.
We have our own cherry picker which we often use but is also available to hire at Dedham Vale Cherry Picker hire, but some jobs just need the big guns!

40 t crane at full extension to dismantle the willow tree leaning over the caravan at weeley.

Working with cranes

Planting a new orchard in Harwich

So in these very uncertain times it was a pleasure today to be out in the North East Essex countryside planting an orchard.   I always get much more pleasure from adding to nature than anything else.  Work is still coming in and while we are permitted to be out working we will continue to do so.  The nature of our work means that social distancing is very easy.
We often work with customers who are classed in the ‘vulnerable’ category in our current fight against Coronavirus.  If we can do anything to help our customers in the Colchester, Manningtree and Dedham Vale areas with collecting anything from shops for them please let us know.

A busy time for Dedham Vale Tree Surgery

Well it has been a busy time for Dedham Vale Tree Surgery as we have been working not just around Colchester and the Dedham Vale, but all over Essex, and lately a fair amount of Suffolk too; working regularly in Ipswich and as far out as Aldeburgh recently for a customer who insisted on using us despite the relative distance. Which is of course very flattering. We have been recruiting new team members and purchasing new plant and machinery to meet demand and provide an efficient service to our customers new and existing.
We do however at this time of year when carrying out tree work have to pay particular attention to the nesting birds, and our apologies if we have to schedule your tree felling or pruning, and especially hedge cutting until later in the year. Not only is it a moral duty to support our wildlife, it is also a duty under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. Sadly there are unscrupulous people in every industry and should you see anyone contravening the act you can report them on 101 to the Wildlife Crime Officer.

Manningtree oak reduction

A couple of weeks ago we embarked on a large oak reduction, the customers spec was to only reduce the extending lateral branches that were impeaching onto the road and towards his property. On my site assessment I decided the best course of action was to utilise our cherry picker and complex rigging equipment. The customer was very pleased with the finished product and has booked us in for further work.

The job took place on the busy road joining Lawford, Mistley and Manningtree. With the correct traffic management the job was completed in a safe and efficient manner.

Cherry picker in use in Manningtree

Tree of the year!

This year’s Tree of the Year award goes to a stunning 1,000 year old oak in Liverpool. The Woodland Trust has decided that Allerton Oak in Calderstones Park will now represent the UK in a European competition. One of the other entries in the competition was a local tree, a 200 year old sycamore growing on the wall of Colchester Castle.
Allerton Oak has an interesting history and in medieval times it is believed to have been the meeting place for the local court. A large crack down its side was supposedly created by the Lottie Sleigh, a ship carrying 11 tonnes of gunpowder which exploded while moored in the Mersey nearby in 1864.

During the second world war, leaves from the tree were sent with letters to local soldiers on the frontline to remind them of home.

Jay is leaving us.

So some sad news for our team this week as Jay our 2nd climber is leaving us at the end of the month to start a new life in Sussex. We have loved working with Jay over the last couple of years and wish him every success for the future. There is therefore a vacancy for a climber so if you are interested please contact Harry on 07756 811098

Dog Blog

As regular customers will know my rescue dog Shelby often comes out and about to work with me.
We always check before Shelby is permitted into a client’s garden and we understand if people do not want her to come out of the truck. However 99% of our clients are very happy to see Shelby and Shelby frequently makes new doggy friends with client’s dogs.
A quick google search will highlight the many studies that show the importance of pets as a support to mental health and a couple of our regular freelance climbers bring their dogs with them too which we are happy to support.
We often find that we have clients who adore dogs but for varying reasons are unable to have one of their own and it has been known to find Shelby on a client’s sofa being hand fed sausages watching tv with the client!
However please know that we totally appreciate that not everyone wants a dog in the garden and we always check before Shelby (or any other pooch) is released from the truck

Kielder Forest

As holidays in the UK grow more popular 1000s of people flock to traditional locations like Devon, Cornwall and Pembrokeshire. However a visit to Northumberland a couple of summers ago not only provided a welcome break from hordes of people but also enabled me to visit Kielder Water and Forest Park, which is England’s largest man made woodland at over 250 square miles. Additionally it is home to the biggest man made lake in Northern Europe so there is a lot to see and do here, best of all no mobile reception so you can really get away from the demands of life! Highly recommended even if you’re not as tree obsessed as me!

 

Non native trees

Continuing from last week’s post about native trees I have again used the Woodland trust website to provided a definition of non native trees:
Any species that has been brought to the UK by humans is called non-native. This means that species would not naturally live here if it were not for us intentionally or accidentally bringing them here. About 8,000 years ago, Neolithic man first arrived in Britain and brought new species, such as plant crops and livestock, and a few stowaways like the house mouse.

There are many non-native species living in the UK. Some, like Douglas fir and Sitka spruce, are used in forestry; and others, such as copper beech and London plane, were brought here for their beauty.

Below is a link to non native trees, some of them may surprise you!

Defining native trees

In these blogs I often mention native trees and I thought it may be time to define this, which I have done below from the definition provided on the Woodland Trust website.
The term native is used for any species that has made its way to the UK naturally, not intentionally or accidentally introduced by humans. In terms of trees and plants, these are species that recolonised the land when the glaciers melted after the last ice age and before the UK was disconnected from mainland Europe.

During the ice age itself, areas of the UK were completely covered by a huge ice sheet. This prevented many trees and plants from growing and many species retreated south to survive the freeze. The ice sheets that covered large areas of the planet locked up lots of water from the Earth’s system. This made sea levels much lower than today and exposed a strip of land (now submerged beneath the Channel Sea) that connected the UK to mainland Europe.

As the Earth warmed and ice began to melt and retreat (over 10,000 years ago), species began to recolonise the once frozen land from the warmer south. However, trapped water released back into the system from the melting ice caused sea levels to rise again. Gradually the rising sea flooded the land bridge from the UK to Europe and prevented any more species (unless they could fly) from colonising the UK.

The link below will take you to a list of native trees, we are always happy to advise you on the best tree for your garden and the location you want it in.

Nesting Birds

At this time of year the birds are nesting in our hedgerows and in order to protect them and their young there are laws in place. Sadly there are some unscrupulous people in our industry who will ignore these laws and if you see this going on it should be reported. The RSPB recommends not cutting hedges and trees between March and August as this is the main breeding season for nesting birds.

https://www.rspb.org.uk

Chelsea flower show

So the 2019 Chelsea Flower show is on this week, and this year for the show Forestry England is working with garden designer Sarah Eberle to create The Resilience Garden – which celebrates the forests of the future. The garden will suggest potential solutions to protect the nation’s woods and forests against a changing climate, including the increasing threats of pests and diseases.
The Resilience Garden design is inspired by the revolutionary Victorian gardener William Robinson who introduced the notion of the ‘wild garden’ through his experimental planting.

 

Forest Bathing

The Japanese practice of Forest Bathing is becoming more popular in the UK as a way to de-stress. It is quite simply being calm and quiet among the trees, here are some tips to enjoy Forest Bathing:
What

  • Turn off your devices to give yourself the best chance of relaxing, being mindful and enjoying a sensory forest-based experience.

  • Slow down. Move through the forest slowly so you can see and feel more.

  • Take long breaths deep into the abdomen. Extending the exhalation of air to twice the length of the inhalation sends a message to the body that it can relax.

  • Stop, stand or sit, smell what’s around you, what can you smell?

Trees for dogs in Dedham

So here is our lovely dog Atlas having a nose around the canine parkour course at Dog Training for Essex & Suffolk in Ardleigh with logs for the course all supplied by Dedham Vale Tree Surgery.
This is a superb dog training school with loads of innovative classes as well as regular obedience. We have 3 rescue dogs and they all enjoy their time there. Dedham Vale Tree Surgery likes to support other local small businesses and we throroughly recommend Dog Training for Essex & Suffolk and their canine parkour course as well!

Apprentice turns pro!

Regular customers will have got to know our team well by now as most of them have been with us for many years and you can see their pics on the website ‘meet the team’ page.
They are all local lads and Tristan has been with us since day one and in fact trained and qualified alongside Harry at Otley College.
We are very pleased to say that Ross is imminently qualifying as a fully fledged arborist and will be joining us full time once he has done so. He has been a part time member of the team working around his college course for several years.

Sidmouth Donkey Sanctuary’s Impressive Trees.

Well this week I spent some time in Devon visiting relatives. While we were there we went to a superb donkey sanctuary near Sidmouth – highly recommend a visit if you are in the area https://www.thedonkeysanctuary.org.uk
Whilst there as well as all the adorable donkeys I saw this fantastic example of these pleached Limes .
This is something that can be recreated in the residential garden if you have enough space and Dedham Vale Tree Surgery can install the wooden structure it requires in addition to the planting and training.

 

Forestry Commission

The Forestry Commission has announced that the poet laureate Carol Ann Duffy has created new work to mark their centenary.
They’re asking the public to follow in her footsteps and write about what trees, forests and woodlands mean to them.

They’re collecting letters, poems and memories to celebrate trees and forests everywhere. That may be a favourite woodland walk, a fond forest memory, a tree you used to climb, or a tree with character and history that you pass each day on the way to work.

Will you take a moment to write yours? Here is the link: